Apa ki te Ao

 

 

 

 

Apa ki te Ao was created for whānau to help get you started - the 101 of Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tōtanga. The full resource includes a booklet, wallet card and USB with cool videos to help you learn your pepeha. 

 

 

Research Links

We are lucky in the digital age to have access to various collections, research databases, and other online resources. These are our current ‘Top 10’:

1.

Papers Past - National Library of New Zealand

2.

The Prow - Stories from the Top of the South

3.

Archives New Zealand

4.

Births, Deaths and Marriages - Historical

5.

Māori Land Online

6.

Appendices to the Journals of House of Representatives

7.

Kura Heritage Collections

8.

Archaeological Site Recording

9.

Hocken Collections - Uare Taoka o Hākena

10. 

Land Information NZ

 

 

Māori Land

Māori land is a taonga tuku iho, a treasure handed down. But without information about the land that you may own or one day inherit the process is tough. Having knowledge of the unique whakapapa connections Māori have with their whenua instils a sense of identity and belonging which is a basic need for everyone. 

Before the arrival of colonial settlers, all land was held as customary land. One of the primary tasks of the early Native Land Court was to define the boundaries of that land and convert it from communally held land by allocating owners and shares. Only a small number of customary land blocks remain in New Zealand and they total less than 700 hectares.

 

Māori Land Online

This website provides a snapshot of current ownership, trustee, memorial and block information for land that falls within the jurisdiction of the Māori Land Court under Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993 and other legislation – this is primarily Māori Customary and Māori Freehold Land, but also includes General Land Owned by Māori, Crown Land Reserved for Māori and some treaty settlement reserves, mahingā kai and fishing rights areas.

Māori Land Court

If you own or have an interest in Māori land, the Māori Land Court is a judicial forum through which you can interact with other owners or interested people about the current and future use, ownership, occupation and/or management of Māori land. There are nine offices of the Māori Land Court across New Zealand and these are open between 10am and 4pm on weekdays. You don’t need to make an appointment. You can find more information here